Floristry Books to Study

My love of books has no limits. The knowledge contained within the pages, the stories, the photographs. Each new book is a welcome addition into my home. Studying floristry online has required searching for additional material. The perfect excuse to carry out some serious shopping for floristry books.

floristry books

Info:
A best-selling guide to plants and flowers, updated and revised by the experts at RHS. Over 8,000 easy-to-find plants and flowers, with thousands of photographs will give you all the guidance you need. Each variety is photographed and the new “how to” section tells you all you need to know on cultivation, pruning and care. Plus, use the special plant selector to grow for every possible situation and condition, from sunless walls to sandy soil. The RHS Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers is an expert guide to planning your dream garden, redesigned to aid navigation and make identifying plants easier than ever. The perfect addition to any gardener’s bookshelf.

What I think:
I really needed an encyclopaedia and this seemed like the best choice. Although it has been invaluable, I find the photos too small to fully appreciate each plant and flower. If anyone has a suggestion, I’d love to hear about more detailed encyclopaedias!

floristry books

Info:
Dazzle your friends and family with elegant floral displays once you’ve passed “the course”, a combination of stylish design ideas and practical tips offered by the world-renowned teacher of flower arranging. Soon you will be creating exquisite, professional-looking arrangements. Every aspect of floral design, from finding inspiration to choosing suitable containers and accessories, is explored in depth. Sumptuous “palette spreads” bring to life the fundamentals of colour, shape, and texture, enabling you to apply them to your own creations. And, to ensure success, hundreds of close-up photographs graphically demonstrate each step of the technical processes, from cutting to wiring, preserving flowers to forming indoor topiaries.

What I think:
The fantastic Fabricio of Flor Studio recommended Jane Packer’s Flowers Design Philosophy to me. I had to buy the book second-hand as I wasn’t able to find a new edition. I have inhaled this book, absorbed the information, poured over the details. Absolutely brilliant.

floristry books

Info:
In Jane Packer’s Flower Course, the celebrated florist covers the same ground as the highly regarded four-week career course taught in her flower school, putting her wealth of experience and her celebrated designs within the reach of every reader. This beautiful book is divided into three sections. covering irresistible floral gifts, gorgeous arrangements of all shapes and sizes, and fabulous party and wedding flowers. The emphasis throughout is on clarity and simplicity, so glorious photographs of finished arrangements are accompanied by step-by-step photographs and easy-to-follow instructions.

What I think:
Since I really enjoyed Flowers Design Philosophy and would so love to do the four-week course, this was the next-best option. More modern than the previous book, it is absolutely perfect to practise different arrangements while I’m studying.

floristry books

Info:
Filled with an array of stunning, easy-to-find flowers, the Flower Recipe Book features 400 photos, more than 40 step-by-step instructions, and useful tips throughout. The arrangements run the gamut of styles and techniques: some are wild and some are structured; some are time-intensive and some are astonishingly simple. Each one is paired with a “flower recipe”; ingredients lists specify the type and quantity of blooms needed; clear instructions detail each step; and hundreds of photos show how to place every stem. Readers will learn how to work with a single variety of flower to great effect, and to create vases overflowing with layered blooms. To top it off, the book is packed with ideas for unexpected vessels, seasonal buying guides, a source directory, a flower care primer, and all the design techniques readers need to know.

What I think:
I have been following Studio Choo some time now on Instagram and came across their book while I was in Canada. The concept of the book is so simple and beautiful, easy arrangements presented recipe-style. I love the use of colour, their style and choice of flowers and foliage. I’ve pawed through this book endlessly but haven’t tried any of the “recipes” yet. I can’t wait.

floristry books

Info:
Not everyone has a garden—but with only a handful of materials and a little bit of time, everyone can bring the beauty of nature into their home. Plant Craft features projects inspired by the natural world and made out of live plants, cut flowers, foraged branches, and more. Learn how to create a colourful floral mural, an elegant table centrepiece, a serene underwater sculpture, a whimsical mobile, and more. The step-by-step instructions are clear, easy to follow, and fully illustrated with colour photographs, and the projects vary in difficulty. Given the right care, they all have the potential to grace a home for a long time.

What I think:
On this new path that is unfolding in my life, the idea is to focus on creativity for events and photo shoots in the future. In other words, I don’t want to just learn how to make arrangements and bouquets. I want to make things with my hands. This is the best book I’ve come across for creative projects and it really helps to get ideas pumping.

There you have it, the round-up of books that I am finding indispensable while studying. If you have any recommendations, let me know in the comments!

Ikebana: A Tribute to Nature and Silence

I have always been fascinated with Japanese culture, especially their views on nature. So I jumped at the chance to learn a bit about ikebana as an extra to my floristry course. This was the perfect opportunity to learn with a teacher, while receiving guidance and feedback during a 6-week course.

I’ve known Azusa Kito for some time now, a sweet and very friendly Japanese woman that teaches different art forms such as ikebana, origami and tea ceremonies, among others. She was the perfect choice to plunge into a first-hand experience with flowers.

tribute to nature

Each class was structured in a similar fashion. With five people in total, this was a small and intimate gathering of people passionate about flowers. Azusa would start each class by explaining the ikebana style that we would be learning that day, presenting her own creation for us to study. We learned Japanese words related to ikebana and details about Japanese culture.

tribute to nature

Before starting our ikebana, we would meditate for a few minutes. After a busy day of work, there was nothing better than entering Azusa’s space, closing your eyes and breathing. Letting go of the tension accumulated during the previous hours.

I’m not going to go into details about ikebana, as there is already so much information online. What I will share is the emotional aspect. With a supply of foliage and flowers, it was a unique experience to study each stem, the leaves, the angle and tilt of each flower. This is a slow process that demands attention and concentration. This is a tribute to nature.

tribute to nature

After selecting the precise elements to be used, the idea is to very slowly build the arrangement. Using both hands at all times, while engaging sight, smell and touch. Enjoying the silence and the occasional sounds from scissors or sighs.

It was curious to see how five people could create totally different ikebana with the same elements, adding their personal touch and vision. The excitement at the end of each class was contagious. The complete satisfaction of creating something of beauty.

tribute to nature

The classes flew by too quickly and soon it was time to create our own personal ikebana. What attracts me to this Japanese style is the austere aspect. The use of few elements in order for the flowers and leaves, the stems, even the imperfections to really shine. There is no clutter. I often find traditional flower arranging to be overpowering, a riot of colour and texture. The individual beauty of each element is often obscured. But I know that I have to learn everything at moment. There will be time enough to follow my own rules and tastes.

tribute to nature

Literally Turning Over a New Leaf

studying floristry online

After years of constant computer companionship, endless hours of freelance work, loads of projects, companies and clients, a stream of endless demands, I was starting to feel burnt-out and empty. A constant void that filled me with dread, things were not good.

It took me a while to sort things out but I managed in the end. I felt lost, with no purpose in sight. Yet the key was already there, present in my personal and professional life. I was most happy when running in Montjuic, surrounded by nature. Excited while travelling and visiting gardens and forests. When I was working on photo shoots and could incorporate plants and flowers. The answers we need are almost always right in front of us or already inside us. No matter how many times I realize this, it always amazes me.

studying floristry online

Nature has always been such a huge factor in my life. Growing up in Canada, you are surrounded by forests, gardens, and wildlife on a daily basis. I search for the forests and gardens wherever I go in the world. In recent years, nature had become a constant source of escape and solace. My home is filled with plants and I often had fresh flowers. Could I change my life in order to achieve a professional balance that involved working with my beloved plants and flowers?

studying floristry online

So after researching floristry schools and courses for about three months, I decided to take the plunge. I would have loved to study full-time, dedicate two years to this new path that had emerged. But I still had to work. There was also the expense and the course work itself. Did I really want to spend blocks of time studying history or marketing once again? Not really.

I’m not entirely convinced it was the best option but I decided on studying floristry online. That way I could continue working and study on my own time. As I am nearing the end, I have my doubts. I’ve always managed to learn along the way, through courses and books, on my own, but floristry involves so much practical work. Will internships be enough? I practice with fresh flowers as much as possible and have searched for external resources to add to the course itself, from books to video tutorials, even working at a flower shop during special occasions such as Sant Jordi.

studying floristry online

I absolutely love everything I’m learning, I’m fascinated and I document everything I see. Working with flowers, learning and trying each technique, fills the void I had inside. The beauty leaves me absolutely breathless. The flowers and foliage demand utter concentration, a stillness, absolute. I am present when I am working with elements from nature. The house is filled with subtle scents and a riot of colour. Tending to the arrangements, learning how to make these elements from nature last as long as possible, watching the process of decay. It is mesmerizing.

studying floristry online

Yet there is the doubt. Studying floristry online, creating a new path, this is important, this is something for me at the moment. I know I can be too organized, not know how to let things go. The need to be in control to feel that everything will go well. I have barely any feedback regarding what I’m doing. No physical teacher to guide and correct. Am I learning enough? Or is this a creative path that lasts a lifetime? I’m more than aware that there is no right or wrong, I build my life. I think studying online is excellent for certain courses but difficult for more practical careers.

In the mean time, I’m going to finish my course and start some internships. And practise like crazy… I’m curious and excited to see where this will lead me. I love to have a studio workshop one day, concentrate on creative arrangements for events and photo shoots. But there are loads of steps to enjoy before then.

studying floristry online